32 eggs safely in an incubator at Meinypil’gyno base camp, 22 June 2016. Photo by Roland Digby.

News from the field: An almost full incubator, a breakdown and T8!

A quick update to let you know that the team in Russia now has 32 eggs, not all the collection trips have gone smoothly with the quad bike transporting the last clutch breaking down at the western oil drills, and another headstarted bird, White T8, has been spotted. Roland has let us
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News from the field: More eggs and some good and bad news from the western oil drills

Update just in from Roland: the western area of Meinypil’gyno is proving good for pairs this year, a bird from the 2014 headstarting cohort has been spotted and 20 eggs are in the incubator. On the 15 June, a small team including Nikolai, Egor and Roman and Sveta’s family, heade
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First egg collection of the 2016 expedition, 13 June 2016.

News from the field: First eggs collected in Russia

Egg collection at Meinypil’gyno is underway and another headstarted bird has been spotted – White E7, headstarted just last year. The first eggs required for the headstarting programme were collected a couple of days ago, on 13 June. Three clutches have been collected so far tot
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Light green A1 back at the breeding grounds on 8 June 2016. Photo by Egor Loktionov.

News from the field: Dry conditions, a bear and the first photos

As reported in the last blog, conditions this year are unusually warm and dry. While these conditions have been good for breeding habitat in some low-level areas, conditions are too dry in many of the key areas used by breeding Spoon-billed Sandpipers in recent years at Meinypil’gyno.
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Steller's eiders in Norway, March 2016 (Kane Brides/WWT)

News from the field: White MA is back!

As mentioned in the last blog, we were really hoping to see the Spoon-billed Sandpiper marked White MA (white leg-flag engraved with the letters MA) this year. He was headstarted by Roland and the team in 2013, has been seen and photographed in the flyway, and returned to successfully
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The one and only photo from Meina!

Sorry for the silence everyone. It’s been all hands to the pumps, both here at Slimbridge and in Meina. What’s more the team in Meina are struggling with one of the dodgiest internet connections they’ve had in recent years, but we can now reveal the one photo and only photo they’ve ma
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Roughing it gives great rewards!

We are just back in Yangon having spent the last 8 days on an expedition to resurvey the waders that winter on the upper Bay of Martaban. The team consisted of Nigel Clark from the BTO, Guy Anderson, Graeme Buchanan and Rhys Green from the RSPB, Geoff Hilton from WWT and five ornithol
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Spoon-billed Sandpipers in Myanmar: a tourist’s account

An international team has just arrived in Myanmar to survey Spoon-billed Sandpipers in the Gulf of Mottama. While we wait for their news, here is an account of a recent holiday visit to the country from Sash Tusa. The tide was still rising, and we had agreed to postpone lunch for the
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Just some of the dead and dying birds showing signs of poisoning: Red-necked Stints, Kentish and Lesser Sand Plovers, Dunlin and even a Red-necked Phalarope. Thankfully we didn't find any spoonies. For now. (c) Guy Anderson

More from the Spoon-billed Sandpiper Survey team China: good news and bad news

Nigel Clark wrote on the start of autumn surveys for Spoon-billed Sandpipers along the Jiangsu Province coastline, in China. Guy Anderson takes up the story… The tide is falling.  The huge mudflats on the Chinese east coast are revealing themselves again, a twice daily disappear
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Lime green J1 (c) Kouhei Shinomiya

2014 juvenile seen in Japan

A spoon-billed sandpiper that hatched in the wild this summer at Meinypilgyno has been spotted on migration in Japan. Japanese birder Kouhei Shinomiya photographed the bird on the Yoshino River in Tokushima Prefecture. The inscription J1 on its lime green leg flag is clear in the phot
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